Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th Global Summit and Expo on Biomass and Bioenergy Hilton Zurich Airport, Zurich, Switzerland.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Christophe Len

Université de Compiègne, France

Keynote: Recent advances in catalytic production of biobased furan derivatives
Conference Series Biomass 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Christophe Len photo
Biography:

Prof. Dr. Christophe Len became assistant Professor at UPJV in 1997 and was promoted to full Professor in 2004 at the Université de Poitiers (France). In 2010, he moved as full Professor at the Université de Technologie de Compiègne (France). In 2017, he developed his research in Chimie ParisTech (France). He has published almost 150 original publications and review articles, 5 chapters and 8 patents. Among recent awards and recognition to his scientific career, he was promoted Honorary Professor of the University of Hull, England (2012-2018), Honorary Life Fellow of Indian Society of Chemists and Biologists (ISCB, 2014), Fellow of the Association of Carbohydrate Chemists and Technologist of India (ACCTI, 2015) and Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC, 2015). In 2017, he has been honored with 2017 Glycerine Innovation Award sponsored by the American Cleaning Institute and the National Biodiesel Board. His current research explores organic chemistry and catalysis applied to biomass.

Abstract:

The design of environmentally friendly methodologies has been the driving force of scientists in recent years. In particular, the use of biomass-derived materials, green solvents and alternatives techniques has been investigated for the production of platform molecules and chemicals such as furfural, hydroxymethylfurfural... Several green chemistry approaches that target advanced synthesis and processes will be presented. All these approaches include the production of (i) furfural and derivatives from D-xylose, xylane and hemicellulose using alternative technologies; (ii) hydroxymethylfurfural and derivatives from D-glucose/D-fructose; (iii) 2,5-diformylfuran from D-fructose. All the process used alternative technologies (eg. microwave irradiation, high temperature/ pressure???) in batch and continuous flow via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis.[1-8] Conception, synthesis and physicochemical properties will be detailed. Recent Publications 1. Verma S, Nasir Baig RB, Nadagouda MN, Len C, Varma RS (2017) Sustainable pathway to furanics from biomass via heterogeneous organo-catalysis. Green Chemistry 19: 164-168. 2. Wang Y, Len T, Huang Y, Tabaoda AD, Boa AN, Ceballos C, Delbecq F, Mackenzie G, Len C (2017) Sulfonated Sporopollenin as an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for dehydration of D-xylose and xylan into furfural. ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering 5: 392-398. 3. Le Guenic S, Gergela D, Ceballos C, Delbecq F, Len C (2016) Furfural production from D-xylose and xylan by using stable Nafion NR50 and NaCl in a microwave-assisted biphasic reaction. Molecules 21: 1102-1112. 4. Delbecq F, Wang Y, Len C (2016) Conversion of xylose, xylan and rice husk into furfural via betaine and formic acid mixture as novel homogeneous catalyst in biphasic system by microwave-assisted dehydration. Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 423: 520-525. 5. Le Guenic S, Delbecq F, Ceballos C, Len C (2015) Microwave-aided dehydration of D-xylose into furfural by diluted inorganic salts solution in a biphasic system. Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical 410: 1-7.

Keynote Forum

Magda Constantí

University Rovira I Virgili,Spain

Keynote: Biomass valorization by means of catalytical and biological processes
Conference Series Biomass 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Magda Constantí photo
Biography:

Magda Constanti is an Associate Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University Rovira i Virgili, in Catalonia, Spain, and belongs to the Interfibio research group. She has expertise on the use of microorganisms and enzymes to different technological applications, which gives her a broad research vision. She has supervised several Doctoral and Master's theses related to biodegradation of toxic chemicals, biomass transformation to value added chemicals or bioenergy using microorganisms and enzymes, among others. She publishes in journals of biotechnology and chemical engineering areas. Currently, she co-directs with Dr. Francisco Medina (Director of the Catheter Research Group) a research project based on the bioproduction of value-added compounds from the residual lignocellulosic biomass.

Abstract:

Woody biomass is an abundant raw material, vastly available in nature. Each of the three main components of woody biomass, namely lignin, hemicelluloses and celluloses are themselves valuable resources, if being selectively transformed in valuable compounds. In this study, nut shell biomass was hydrolyzed with water assisted by microwave and the products were biologically treated without any separation process. Thus, the hydrolyzed product, xylose (from hemicellulose) was fermented by the appropriate microorganism for the production of lactic acid, the monomer of polylactic acid, a biodegradable plastic. Pure cellulose was also hydrolyzed to glucose and then fermented to lactic acid, as well. We obtained a high conversion to optically pure lactic acid through a non-petrochemical pathway. On the other hand, cellulose was hydrolyzed using basic catalysts, such as hydrotalcites, also assisted by microwave. Although the conversion was lower compared to acidic hydrolysis, alkali hydrolysis gave directly smaller molecules (C2-C3) with higher functional group densities. In conclusion, we propose a multidisciplinary study for the combination of catalytical and biological processes for the valorization of residual biomass, which makes the process more sustainable in the current society. Recent Publications 1. G�ell E J, Maru B T, Chimentao R J, Gispert-Girado F, Constant� M and Medina F (2015) Combined heterogeneous catalysis and dark fermentation systems for the conversion of cellulose into biohydrogen. Biochemical Engineering Journal 101:209- 219. 2. Gavil� L, Constant� M and Medina F (2015) D-lactic acid production from cellulose: dilute acid treatment of cellulose assisted by microwave followed by microbial fermentation. Cellulose 22:3089-3098. 3. Gavil� L, G�ell E J, Maru B T, Medina F and Constant� M (2017) Combining catalytical and biological processes to transform cellulose into high value-added products. Physical Sciences Reviews DOI: 10.1515/psr-2017-0026. 4. Gavil� L, Constant� M, Medina F, Pezoa-Conte R, Anufwom I, Mikkola J P An integrated biomass to lactic acid process. Submitted to Advanced Sustainable Systems. 5. Guarin C, Gavil� L, Constant� M, Medina F Impact of cellulose treatment with hydrotalcites in hidrothermal catalytic conversion. Submitted to Chemical Engineering Science.

  • Biomass Conversion Methods | Biomass Applications | Biomass Energy Resources | Biomass Power & Thermal
Location: Meeting Hall -Brussels
Speaker

Chair

Ferruccio Pittaluga

University of Genoa, DIME, Italy

Speaker

Co-Chair

Magda Constant

University Rovira I Virgili, Spain

Speaker
Biography:

Ferruccio Pittaluga, recently retired, has been full professor of Thermal Machines at the University of Genoa. Now continues his teaching activity as contract professor. His fields of interests have been Thermo-Fluid Dynamics, Combustion & Gasification, Atmospheric Emissions. In 1998 he established DIME/SCL, the Combustion Laboratory of the University of Genoa, of which has been in charge up to his retirement in 2015. The participation to numerous National and EC-funded R&D programmes, mostly dealing with environmental sustainability of combustion processes, has granted, in the years, rich support for research activities and technological developments. In 2011, with a few of his former doctoral students, he was co-founder (and since then, president) of Tecnoforest, an academic spin-off (now an innovative SME) addressed at rapid growth forestation, wood gasification and biomass-based renewable energy cogeneration. Tecnoforest has been for some years Italian representative of APL gasifiers (USA).

Abstract:

Starting from 2012, the innovative SME Tecnoforest Ltd. (formerly an academic spin-off of the University of Genoa) has addressed its activity towards the testing of existing, and the development of new, small-scale biomass gasification technologies aimed at assuring electric and thermal self sufficiency to rural enterprises of the agricultural and wood-based sectors (www.tecnoforest.wordpress.com). Tecnoforest researchers took great advantage from the parallel activities being carried out at DIME/SCL, the Combustion Laboratory of the DIME Department, University of Genoa (www.en2.unige.it/savonacombustion- lab/). On the other hand the intrinsic limitation of these power plants??? typologies, common to both downdraft and updraft gasifiers, has become apparent as the main obstacle preventing, in absence of costly abatement provisions, their continuity of operation: namely, the unavoidable need of progressively heavier maintenance provisions, especially related to the removal of sticky carbon-rich deposits and soot on the internal surfaces of the various plant components. In order to tackle this issue, a novel approach has been recently pursued at Tecnoforest, based on the evidence that no tar is produced not only when woodchips are directly burned, but also when they undergo a delayed combustion (i.e. a gasification) provided the embers are not ???stifled??? from an overwhelming amount of feedstock weighing upon them from above. This concept, which implies a ???floating??? front of the embers (without any physical hearth), has been implemented in three similar types of ???gasifiers???, all of sturdy, ???rural??? technology, two fully operational and already on the market, a third still undergoing development. They are the following: ???SynChar???, a thermal converter featuring a cyclic (batch) operative modality, producing biochar of pharmaceutical quality while a clean syngas flame issues from its top nozzle; ???SynBurner???, a clean syngas generator, with continuous operation, suitable to fuel gas burners for air heaters, boilers and furnace applications; ???SynGen??? a syngas generator suitable to feed dualfuel diesel gensets, after proper mixing, for ignition purposes, with small quantities of vegetable oils, even exhausted. Recent Publications 1. Ballesteros-Plata D, Infantes-Molina A, Rodr�guez-Cuadrado M, Rodr�guez-Aguado E, Braos-Garc�a P, Rodr�guez- Castell�n 1. D.Accornero, E.Manzino, F.Pittaluga (2011). Rapid-Growth Forestation Techniques and Wood Thermal Pre-Treatments for Enhanced Energy Generation. Proceed. CEBC, Central European Biomass Conference 2011, Graz, Austria, Jan. 2011 2. Accornero D, Caruggi M, A. Nilberto, Pittaluga F (2011). Nuovo impianto di produzione elettrica da 800 kW mediante gassificazione di biomasse. Atti del Convegno ATI, Associazione Termotecnica Italiana, Arcavacata di Rende (CS), 05/09/2011, p. 1-7, ISBN: 9788895267111 3. D.Accornero, E.Manzino, F.Pittaluga (2012). A novel separation technology for nano- particles at discharge of combustion and incineration equipment. EQA Environmental Quality, 8 (2012), p. 13-24, ISSN: 2281-4485 4. D.Accornero, A.Nilberto, F.Pittaluga (2013). Design features and performance data of a new 400 kW biomass gasification plant of downdraft type. J. Energy and Power Engineering, Vol.7, N.2, Febr. 2013, p. 229-236, ISSN: 1934-8975 5. E.Manzino, D.Olampi, F.Pittaluga (2015). Performance Analysis of a Woodchip Downdraft Gasifier: Numerical Prediction and Experimental Validation. J. Energy and Power Engineering. Vol.9, N.4, Apr. 2015, p. 336-347, ISSN: 1934-8975

Biography:

Antonia Infantes-Molina is a Senior researcher at the University of Malaga. Chemical Engineer (2002) and Ph in Science (2006-University of Malaga) has developed its research line in the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials and nanocatalysts as well as their use for environmental applications. After her PhD, she has studied adsorbent materials in collaboration with Pesquisa em Separações por Adsorção, Universidade Federal do Ceará (Brasil); catalytic systems for clean fuels production in the Institute of Catalysis and Petroleochemistry (ICP-CSIC) in Madrid (Spain) and NOx catalytic removal from mobile sources and catalytic processes for CO2 transformation in the Laboratory of Catalysis and Catalytic Processes group at Politecnico di Milano. Her current research includes catalytic hydrodeoxygenation as well as waste valorization: new catalytic formulations and new applications for ashes derived from biomass treatment.

Abstract:

The use of bio-energy as a renewable alternative to fossil fuels is nowadays attracting more and more attention. The biofuel from biomass seems to be a potential energy substitute for fossil fuels since it is a renewable resource that could contribute to sustainable development and global environmental preservation and it appears to have significant economic potential. Liquid fuels can be obtained from fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, where fast pyrolysis is a promising route because the process takes place at moderate temperatures, in absence of air and with a short hot vapor residence time. However, these liquid fuels have poor quality due to their low volatility, high viscosity, low heating value, a high oxygen content and poor chemical stability. This high oxygen content is due to the presence of oxygen-containing compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, furans and phenols. In this sense, catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is one the most efficient process to remove oxygen from these liquid fuels. In this context, the catalyst design is of upmost importance to achieve a high degree of deoxygenation, and bifunctional catalysts are required to achieve high degrees of activity. Noble metal and non-noble metal based catalysts will be evaluated in HDO of model molecules in order to get further insight about the important role of the active phase. Transition metal phosphides have shown excellent catalytic performances due to their good hydrogen transfer properties that diminishes the amount of metal exposed, avoiding, as much as possible, the deactivation, and modifies the electronic density of the catalyst leading to solids that favors the HDO. In addition these phosphides show bifunctional catalytic properties (metallic sites for hydrogenation and acid sites for cracking, methyl transfer reaction, dehydration and isomerization). Recent Publications 1. Ballesteros-Plata D, Infantes-Molina A, Rodr??�guez-Cuadrado M, Rodr??�guez-Aguado E, Braos-Garc??�a P, Rodr??�guez-Castell??�n E (2017) Incorporation of molybdenum into Pd and Pt catalysts supported on commercial silica for hydrodeoxygenation reaction of dibenzofuran. Applied Catalysis A: General 547: 86-95. 2. Garc??�a-Sancho C, Cecilia JA, M??�rida-Robles, JM, Santamar??�a Gonz??�lez J, Moreno-Tost R, Infantes-Molina A, Maireles-Torres P (2017) Effect of the treatment with H3PO4 on the catalytic activity of Nb2O5 supported on Zr-doped mesoporous silica catalyst. Case study: Glycerol dehydration. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 221: 158-168. 3. Rodr??�guez-Aguado E, Infantes-Molina A, Ballesteros-Plata D, Cecilia JA, Barroso-Mart??�n I, Rodr??�guez-Castell??�n E (2017) Ni and Fe mixed phosphides catalysts for O-removal of a bio-oil model molecule from lignocellulosic biomass. Journal of Molecular Catalysis 437: 130-139. 4. Infantes-Molina A, Moretti E, Segovia E, Lenarda A, Rodr??�guez-Castell??�n, E (2016) Pd-Nb binfunctional catalysts supported on silica and zirconium phosphate heterostructures for O-removal of dibenzofurane. Catalysis Today 277: 143-151. 5. Cecilia JA, Infantes-Molina A, Sanmart??�n-Donoso J, Rodr??�guez-Aguado E, Ballesteros-Plata D, Rodr??�guez-Castell??�n E (2016) Enhanced HDO

Biography:

Dr. Satyawati Sharma is Professor at CRDT, IIT Delhi. She did her post graduation from Agra University and Ph.D. from IIT Delhi. She has more than 140 publications in reputed international and national journals. She has executed 15 sponsored projects and filed four formulations (termite and nematode control and rapid composting) for patenting. She has guided 21 Ph.D. students and 12 are pursuing their Ph.D. She has guided 4 PDFs and 3 PDFs are continuing. She is awarded ‘Iraj Zandi award’ in 2013 in Solid Waste Technology and Management by Widener University, USA and also honored by Royal Society of Chemistry, UK, for ‘Energy Crops’ book. Recipient of ‘Golden Jubilee Award’ for excellence in the field of Khadi and Village Industries” to IIT Delhi by KVIC for MGIRI project jointly. Research areas are Biopesticides and Biofertilizer, Waste management, Tissue culture, Wasteland Reclamation, Mushroom technology, Biogas slurry management.

Abstract:

In the present demand for renewable and sustainable sources of energy to overcome the burden of world energy crisis, perrenial grasses present exciting options. Panicum virgatum (Switchgrass) the ligno-cellulosic perennial grass, being considered as a cheaper and efficient feedstock for bioethanol production in Europe and USA, could also be utilized in India for same purpose. The present work focuses on cultivation of P. virgatum (very first time in India) and P. maximum, for bioethanol production. The seeds of the Switch grass were obtained from Univ. of Bologna, Italy, while of guinea grass from IGFRI, Jhansi, UP, India. Both the grasses were cultivated in Micromodel (an experimental field site), IIT Delhi. The harvested grass biomass was analyzed for various parameters including reducing sugars for subsequent bioethanol production. Among different pretreatment methods (Acid pretreatment, Alkali pretreatment and Microwave pretreatment) tested , alkali method showed maximum reducing sugars (280 mg/g for P. virgatum and 262 mg/g for P. maximum ) with 15 % reduction in crystallinity of cellulose in P. virgatum and 12% in P. maximum. It was further optimized with RSM and CCD was applied. Joint effects of four independent variables: NaOH (1-5%), temp. (60-100 �C), substrate loading (1-3%), and reaction time (30-150 min), were investigated to increase in reducing sugar content. The combined optimum conditions for maximum reducing sugar (68.3% ) were: 2.5% substrate, 5% NaOH, a reaction time 120 min at 100 �C. The result analyzed (ANOVA) with a second order polynomial equation. showed 62 - 68 % significant increase in reducing sugars. The calculated theoretical ethanol production from switch grass was found to be 26.72%, while for P. maximum it was 25.24%. This study reveals that under optimized pretreatment conditions, sugar yield is significantly increased and promises the use of both P. virgatum and P. maximum grasses as feedstock for bioethanol production in India also. All the findings pertaining to all steps in cultivation, characterization, pretreatment and hydrolysis methods and bioethanol from these grasses will be presented at conference. Recent Publications 1. Adak, A., Tiwari, R., Singh, S., Sharma, S., & Nain, L. (2016) Laccase Production by a Novel White-Rot Fungus, Pseudolagarobasidium acaciicola LA 1 Through Solid-State Fermentation of Parthenium Biomass and Its Application in Dyes Decolorization. Waste and Biomass Valorization, 7, 1427-1435. 2. Arora, K., Sharma, S., & Monti, A. (2016) Bio- remediation of Pb and Cd polluted soils by switchgrass: A case study in India. International Journal of Phytoremediation, 7(18), 704-709. 3. Arora, K.; Kumar, A., & Sharma, S. (2012) Energy from Waste: Present Scenario, Challenges and Future Prospects towards Sustainable Development. IGI Global, 271-296. 4. Tiwari, G., Shivangi, Sharma, S., & Prasad, R. (2015) Bioethanol production: Future prospects from non-traditional sources in India. International Journal of Research in Biosciences, 4, 1-15. 5. Kumar, A., & Sharma, S. (2011) Non-edible oil seeds as biodiesel feedstock for meeting energy demands in India, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, 15, 1791-1800.

Biography:

Sitwat Aman has worked on microalgae during her Post-doc in China, where she tried to find out the best strains for biodiesel production. Nowadays, she is working as an Assistant Professor.

Abstract:

Causative agents of many ailments of plants, animal and human are microbes particularly bacteria and fungus which are generally treated using antibiotics, but the frequent occurrence of antibiotic resistance requires the development of new antibiotic agents. Unexplored bioactive natural candidates should be a chance for the production of targeted drugs with antibacterial and antifungal activity. In this paper, polarity based extracts of four different strains of Chlorella spp. has been used against 6 bacterial strains namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Escherichia coli (E.coli), Klebsiella pneumonia (K. pneumonia), Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) and Bacillus thuringiensis (B.thuringiensis) and 6 fungal strains namely Penicillium italicum (P. italicum), Cladophialophora bantiana (C. bantiana), Rhizopus, Aspergillus falvus (A. falvus), Aspergillus niger (A. niger) and Aspergillus terrus (A. terrus) by using levofloxacin as standard antibiotic and pure solvent for comparison. Agar well diffusion assay has been used for antibacterial assay while Rapid Susceptibility Assay (RSA) has been done to measure the antifungal activity of all algal extracts. Later on Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) has been calculated for active extracts while Minimum Bactericidal and Fungicidal Concentrations (MBC and MFC) has been calculated for inactive extracts against fungal and bacterial pathogens. Results have been analyzed statistically and these results suggest that the Chlorella spp. have potential to develop antimicrobial drugs.

Sandeep Kumar

Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Bombay,India

Title: Biomass Gasification: Sustainable technology for waste to energy
Biography:

Sandeep Kumar is Faculty in Dept. of Energy Science & Engg., Indian Institute if Technology (IIT) Bombay, India. He has his expertise in thermo-chemical conversion of biomass and use of alternate fuel in IC engine. His works involves both experimental work as well as CFD based models. He has his basic degree in Mechanical Engineering. His research interest also includes solid combustion, solid waste management and renewable system analysis.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Biomass is a potential source of renewable energy. Agro residue and organic industrial and civic waste provides a huge potential to harvest energy from waste. Biomass gasification is a quite mature technology finding its use in various sectors. Downdraft gasification system is widely used to generate produce gas coupled with IC engine to generate electricity. Oxy-steam gasification yields syngas of high energy density (8-10 MJ/Nm3). High H2 fraction in syngas and its combustion characteristics motivates towards developing a more efficient gasifier-engine system. Also, high silica ash content in few agro residue like paddy waste has motivated to evolve a system to extract useful silica from waste ash. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Oxy-steam gasifier was designed using oxygen and superheated steam mixture as reactant. Woody biomass as well as agro residue was used for study. Steam to biomass ratio was varied from 0.75 to 2.7 and ER from 0.2 to 0.3. Syngas with varying H2/CO ratio was obtained and results analysed. System efficiency was evaluated and CFD based numerical model developed from fundamentals. Silica extraction from paddy waste ash was performed using acid leaching method. Findings: Oxy-steam gasification proved to be highly efficient system with over 80% efficiency achieved at lower steam to biomass ratio of 0.75. The high energy density in the range of 8-9 MJ/Nm3 has been achieved which makes it better fuel compared to producer gas obtained from air gasification. Analysis showed upto 68% silica content ii paddy waste ash. High purity Silica was extracted from residual ash of paddy waste gasification. SEM results showed high quality silica which is in demand in maket. Over 62% Silica was extracted from ash in high purity form. Recent Publications 1. Sandeep K, S. Dasappa, Modeling and analysis of single particle conversion of biomass in a packed bed gasification system. Applied Thermal Engineering. 2017:112:1382-1395 2. Mahapatra S, Sandeep K, Dasappa S. Gasification of wood particles in a co-current packed bed: Experiments and model analysis. Fuel Processing Technology. 2016:145: 76???89 3. Sandeep K, Dasappa S. First and second law thermodynamic analysis of air and oxy-steam biomass gasification. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. 2014:39(34): 19474???19484 4. Sandeep K, Dasappa S. Oxy???steam gasification of biomass for hydrogen rich syngas production using downdraft reactor configuration. International Journal of Energy Research. 2014:38:174???188 5. Anmol Garg, Sandeep K. Oxy-enriched air gasification of wet biomass. Proceedings of the International Conference on Sustainable Energy and Environmental Challenges (SEEC-2017). 26 - 28 February, 2017, Mohali, India (P.No. - 157)

  • Production of Biofuels | Advanced Biofuels & Biochemicals
Location: Meeting Hall -Brussels

Chair

Jinying Yan

KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

Co-Chair

Anushree Malik

Centre for Rural Development and Technology, IIT Delhi, India

Session Introduction

Jinying Yan

KTH - Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden

Title: Sustainable Water-Energy-Environment Nexus for Thermal Bioenergy Conversion
Biography:

Jinying Yan is the Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering and Technology at KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden. Currently his research interests are the emission control technologies for bioenergy conversion processes and energy storage technologies for integration of renewable energy. He has also more than 10 years research experience working on the development of CO2 capture technologies for thermal power generation with focus on gas cleaning, CO2 capture, and CO2 compression & purification. He joined Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto as a Postdoctoral research fellow from 1999 to 2000. He received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from KTH Royal Institute Technology, Stockholm, Sweden in 1998.

Abstract:

A concept of sustainable water-energy-environment nexus has been developed for thermal bioenergy conversion processes as shown in Figures 1 and 2. Two case studies are performed in a biomass-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plant and a waste incineration unit, which intend to approve and implement the concept. The main results from the case study on stormwater issues in biomass-fired CHP plant show that the biomass fuel storage can play an important role in the sustainable development for the water-energy-environment nexus. It has been proved that the water adsorption capacity of wood chips can be used as a buffer to reduce water runoff, to extend the time for natural water evaporation, to receive the recycled runoff water without significant impacts on fuel quality. The runoff water absorbed by the biomass fuels could increase heat recovery and water reuse. The results also indicate that it is possible to achieve near zero water runoff and wastewater emissions in the tested plant area by an integration of stormwater management with the bioenergy conversion processes. Another case study is focused on a closed water loop in waste-to-energy (waste incineration) unit. The closed water loop can properly integrate the thermal energy conversion with an efficient flue gas cleaning, cost-effective water treatment and energy-effective water recovery. The investigation shows that it is possible to achieve a near zero wastewater discharge, which could also result in a significant amount of water recovery for internal usage. The two case studies demonstrate that sustainable water-energy-nexus could be set up in biomass energy conversion processes, which can provide good solutions, handle important issues associate with water resource, energy efficiency and emissions to air and waters in bio energy conversion processes. Recent Publications 1. Galanopoulos C, Yan J, Li H and Liu L (2018) Impacts of acidic gas components on combustion of contaminated biomass fuels. Biomass and Bioenergy 111:263-277. 2. Li H, Tan Y, Ditaranto M, Yan J and Yu Z (2017) Capturing CO2 from biogas plants. Energy Procedia 114:6030-6035. 3. Larsson M, Yan J, Nordenskj�ld C, Forsberg K and Liu L (2016) Characterisation of stormwater in biomass-fired combined heat and power plant-impacts of biomass fuel storage. Applied Energy 170:116-129. 4. Zhang X, Yan J, Li H, Chekani S and Liu L (2015) Investigation of integration between biogas production and upgrading. Energy Conversion and Management 102:131-139. 5. Sun Q, Li H, Yan J, Liu L, Yu Z and Yu X (2015) Selection of appropriate biogas upgrading technology- a review of biogas cleaning, upgrading and utilisation. Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews 51:521-532.

Biography:

Dr. Anushree Malik is a Professor at the Center for Rural Development (CRDT), Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IIT Delhi) and her research areas include Bioremediation, Wastewater Treatment, Algal Biofuels, and Biological Pest Control. She did her Ph.D. from IIT Delhi in the year 2000 and post doc from Utsunomiya University, Japan where she received prestigious Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) fellowship awarded by Government of Japan. Later, she joined School of Environmental Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU) as Assistant Professor. She got associated with IIT Delhi as Assistant Professor in the year 2004 and contributed towards establishing Applied Microbiology Lab. Her lab has developed “Novel Mycotablets” for bioremediation which are designed to possess a unique and ideal combination of characteristics for easy storage & transportability to remote small scale industries. The mycotablet technology, patent for which has been filed, has won DST-Lockheed Martin India Innovation Growth Program (IIGP 2015) award recently. She has also filed patent for fungal assisted algal harvesting.During her research career she has published more than 110 international journal research papers and 17 book chapters. Besides, She is one of the Editors of Algal Biofuels: Recent Advances and Future Prospects, published by Springer. She has completed several research projects funded by various funding agencies like DST, DBT, ICMR, MOEF, MNRE and ICAR. Her work has also received “Top cited paper award 2009-2013” from Elsevier for a paper published in 2009 in Environment International. She has been active reviewer for over 55 reputed journals published from Elsevier, Springer, and Wiley. She is on the Editorial Board of several prestigious journals like “The Open Microbiology Journal”, Bentham Open; “Bioremediation and Bioavailability”, U.K.; “Journal of Bioremediation and Biodegradation”, U.S.A. and “Frontiers in Food Microbiology”, Switzerland. She has total 4883 citations with h-index of 33 and i-10 index of 72.

Abstract:

Use of pellet forming filamentous fungi (PFFF) for algal bioharvesting presents an interesting approach to enhance the sustainability of algal biofuels. The present work describes the critical factors governing algal-fungal interactions in two different modes i.e. during algal-fungal co-cultivation and while using pre-cultivated algal and fungal biomass. To begin with, identification of the limiting factors and subsequent optimization of the process during co-cultivation was attempted using eight fungal strains (Prajapati et al., 2014). It was found that the conventional algal growth media (BG11) needs to be supplemented with carbon and nutrient sources to support PFFF growth. Further, only Aspergilluslentulus could grow and pelletize, resulting in nearly 100 %harvesting of Chroococcus sp. within 24 h. However, the harvesting time increased with decrease in glucose levels. To further simplify and shorten the process time, a rapid method was developed which includes mixing of algae with pre-cultivated fungal pellets in a prefixed ratio and optimized conditions, resulting in nearly 100% harvesting within 4 h (Prajapati et al., 2016). An insight into the critical parameters revealed that metabolically active fungal pellet with undamaged hyphae is a prerequisite for flocculation. FTIR data showed the involvement of specific groups (C-N groups) in the interaction (Bhattacharya et al., 2017a). A mathematical model developed for the first time (Bhattacharya et. al., 2017b) shows dependence on the radius of the algae and fungi along with the velocity gradient of the media. The theoretical model showed good agreement with the experimental data. A simple incubation of harvested algal???fungal pellets under controlled conditions was associated with significant enzyme activity due to which>54% enhancement in digestibility and up to 50% increase in methane production during anaerobic digestion were noticed. The invented method (1593/DEL/2015) is a unique process of its kind and has potential application in algae based biofuel production. Recent Publications 1. Prajapati, S. K., Kumar, P., Malik, A., &Choudhary, P. (2014). Exploring pellet forming filamentous fungi as tool for harvesting non-flocculating unicellular microalgae. BioEnergy Research, 7(4), 1430-1440. 2. Prajapati, S. K., Bhattacharya, A., Malik, A., & Vijay, V. K. (2015). Pretreatment of algal biomass using fungal crude enzymes. Algal research, 8, 8-14. 3. Prajapati, S. K., Bhattacharya, A., Kumar, P., Malik, A., & Vijay, V. K. (2016). A method for simultaneous bioflocculation and pretreatment of algal biomass targeting improved methane production. Green Chemistry, 18(19), 5230-5238. 4. Bhattacharya, A., Mathur, M., Kumar, P., Prajapati, S. K., & Malik, A. (2017). A rapid method for fungal assisted algal flocculation: critical parameters & mechanism insights. Algal Research, 21, 42-51. 5. Bhattacharya, A., Malik, A., & Malik, H. K. (2017). A mathematical model to describe the fungal assisted algal flocculation process. Bioresource technology, 244, 975-981

Biography:

Servio Tulio Cassini has completed his B S degree in Biological Science from UFMG, Brazil in 1975, MS in Agricultural Microbiology from USP, Brazil in 1980, PhD in Environmental Microbiology from North Carolina State University NCSU-USA in 1988. During 1976-1999, he was a Full Professor in Universidade Federal Vicosa, Full Professor in Environmental Microbiology at Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo UFES-Brazil 1999- till now. During 1996-1997, he was a Visiting Professor in University of Tennessee at Knoxville UTK-USA. He was an Environmental Engineering Graduate Program Coordinator during 2000-2006, UFES Brazil and Brazilian Sanitation Research Program PROSAB-FINEP sludge network coordinator during 2002-2004. His main projects on wastewater and bioenergy and microbiology applied to sanitation engineering.

Abstract:

Microalgae are continuously attracting main attention from biomass researchers, especially due to their capacity of fast growth, CO2 abatement and land-free cultivation as compared with conventional crops. Additionally, municipal wastewater has been long recognized as a suitable media for the cultivation of microalgae biomass. Culturing microalgae with wastewater effluents also promotes a process of tertiary treatment, characterized by removal of main nutrients (N, P) from wastewater and simultaneously achieving high biomass productivities. However, few studies report data concerning biomass productivity in continuous mode using unsterilized mixotrophic wastewater effluent and we found no reports of E. coli population decay rates in these continuous reactors. This study focuses on the selection of native microalgae strains that are applicable for biomass production and tertiary wastewater treatment in continuous mode. Five strains were isolated and cultivated in unsterilized anaerobic effluent in batch growth mode, to identify the efficient microalgae isolates for biomass conversion. The isolate L06 (Chlorella sp.) was selected and evaluated based on five dilution rates from 0.1 to 0.5 1/day on continuous growth reactor, resulting in five steady state conditions. Maximal volumetric biomass productivity of 294 mg/L day was obtained at 0.3 1/day without CO2 addition or air bubbling. Carbohydrates were the major fraction of the dried biomass, followed by proteins and then lipids. The highest removal rates of total nitrogen and phosphorus from the liquid phase were 13.0 and 1.4 mg/L day, respectively, and were achieved at 0.4 1/day. The maximal decay rate for E. coli (3.7 1/day) was also achieved at this dilution rate, representing approximately a 99.9% population reduction of this bioindicator over a period of 2.5 days. Therefore, L06 ??? Chlorella sp. continuous cultivation using secondary-treated wastewater can be adjusted depending on its objective: for biomass production, a dilution rate of approximately 0.3 1/day is recommended; and for tertiary treatment a rate of 0.4 l/day is suggested. Recent Publications 1. Caporgno et al. (2015) Microalgae cultivation in urban wastewater: Nutrient removal and biomass production for biodiesel and methane. Algal Research 10:232-239 2. Gon�alves A L, Pires J C M and Sim�es M (2016) Biotechnological potential of Synechocystis salina co-cultures with selected microalgae and cyanobacteria: Nutrients removal, biomass and lipid production. Bioresource Technology 200:279- 286. 3. Menna F Z, Arbib Z and Perales J A (2015) Urban wastewater treatment by seven species of microalgae and an algal bloom: biomass production, N and P removal kinetics and harvestability. Water Research 83:42-51. 4. Room R, Babor T and Rehm J (2005) Alcohol and public health. Lancet 365: 519-530. 5. Thiansathit et al. (2015) The kinetics of Scenedesmus obliquus microalgae growth utilizing carbon dioxide gas from biogas. Biomass and Bioenergy 76:79-8.

Biography:

Ramiar Sadegh-Vaziri is a PhD candidate at the department of chemical engineering at KTH royal institute of technology in Sweden. He has developed skills in process modeling and numerical simulation. He has worked on different projects including raw syngas cleaning, particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions in two phase turbulent flows, biomass pyrolysis and gasification and modeling of supported liquid membranes. His understanding of transport phenomena and kinetics together with his knowledge of CFD modeling and numerical discretization of partial differential and integro-differential equations have helped him to be involved in various projects

Abstract:

Biomass thermochemical processes suffer from the problem of feedstock variation. In the other words, in order to run commercial biomass-based plants under economically feasible conditions, the process have to be capable of handling very different raw materials, ranging from forest residues to waste materials from various industries. Process modeling is crucial to predict the behavior of different feedstock materials in a given biomass plant. In this work, we consider the slow pyrolysis of biomass to produce biochar. In this process, the main quantity one aims at predicting by means of process modelling is the conversion of raw biomass to biochar as a function of the process conditions. To achieve this aim, the process model requires a kinetic rate expression for describing the evolution of the biomass when subject to thermochemical treatment. Here, we will show that the TGA data processed with an isoconversional method is enough to obtain an effective rate expression which allows for predicting the behavior of the biomass at an arbitrary temperature evolution. Such rate expressions can then be used in the process model to simulate conversion of raw biomass to biochar. An overview of this approach is shown in Fig. 1. To illustrate the feasibility of the approach we will consider different biomasses feedstocks undergoing slow pyrolysis in an indirectly heated rotary kiln reactor. The results of our modeling are then compared to experimental data obtained from a 500 kW pilot plant pyrolyzer and to a more detailed process model. A high level of agreement between the modeling results from this approach and the experimental data and the previously validate detailed process model is observed. This proves the capability of our cost-efficient approach to obtain preliminary design data. Recent Publications 1. Sadegh-Vaziri, R., Amovic, M., Ljunggren, R., & Engvall, K. (2015). A Medium-Scale 50 MWfuel Biomass Gasification Based Bio-SNG Plant: A Developed Gas Cleaning Process. Energies, 8(6), 5287-5302. 2. Sadegh-Vaziri, R., & Babler, M. U. (2017). Numerical investigation of the outward growth of ZnS in the removal of H2S in a packed bed of ZnO. Chemical Engineering Science, 158, 328-339. 3. Sadegh-Vaziri, R., & Babler, M. U. (2017). PBE Modeling of Flocculation of Microalgae: Investigating the Overshoot in Mean Size Profiles. Energy Procedia, 142, 507-512. 4. Babler, M. U., Phounglamcheik, A., Amovic, M., Ljunggren, R., & Engvall, K. (2017). Modeling and pilot plant runs of slow biomass pyrolysis in a rotary kiln. Applied Energy, 207, 123-133. 5. Samuelsson, L. N., Umeki, K., & Babler, M. U. (2017). Mass loss rates for wood chips at isothermal pyrolysis conditions: A comparison with low heating rate powder data. Fuel Processing Technology, 158, 26-34.

Biography:

Eva Sevillano Marco is Extensive mix of social science and technical research approaches, promoting interaction among stakeholders. Collaboration in national and European projects: local action groups, regional governments, forest owners associations, SMEs, universities and research centres in several countries. Essentially, much of my work looks at how research could serve societies at large, and includes participation mechanisms. Research projects linked to nature conservation, rural development and forestry. Topics: local management, forest inventory, silviculture, growth & biomass modelling, suitability mapping, forest attributes estimation using RS and GIS tools, quality indicators spatialization and uncertainty assessment.

Abstract:

The previous version of BIORAISE has been updated and extended to serve georeferenced quantitative data of biomass resources from agriculture, forestry and scrublands. BIORAISE is an open access GIS tool embedding sustainable biomass resources, environmental risks visualization and on-field exploitation costs covering Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Croatia, Slovenia, Greece and Turkey. Additionally relevant stakeholders??? information is also indicated. Georeferenced information is computed on the fly from user-selected locations (pick-up point and area of interest, either within a user-choice circular radio or an administrative boundary from municipality to European Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics NUT3 limits): surfaces (hectares), potential biomass resources (tonnes of dry matter/year) and a more realistic availability derived from harvesting efficiency rates in the case of agricultural resources while considering slope percent rise, soil erosion risk and topsoil organic carbon content (30 cm depth) in the case of forestry resources, together with estimated harvesting and transport costs (???/tonnes of dry matter). Regarding quality parameters, the service provides energy content (GJ/year), and ashes content (% dry matter) on the basis of numbers obtained in a complete laboratory characterization study from biomass samples from the selected countries. The calorific values are updated depending on moisture content choices. The stakeholders databases consists of producers (raw biomass producers, wood, olive oil, nut hulling, and wine sector ???distilleries- industries) and other actors (e.g., equipment and machines for industry, services and facilities, manufacture of biofuels and biomass valorisation, biofuel dealers, research centres, large consumers, and BIOMASUD PLUS biofuel producers). EUROSTAT, national forest inventories, and other statistical data have been integrated in the geospatial agriculture, shrub and forestry surfaces in CORINE LAND COVER 2012. Geoprocessing steps apply residues productivity rates, biofuels annual production data and achieve a compromise between local specifications, consistency of results, data harmonization and homogeneity for such a large area.

Biography:

Alberto Beltrán has his expertise in numerical simulations of hydrodynamic, thermal and magnetohydrodynamics flows. His recent work on plancha-type cookstoves is focused on improving the actual designs based on CFD calculations and to compare them with experimental results. He is also interested in renewable energy and grid scale energy storage systems and their applications. He is the head of the Laboratory for design, modelling and simulations of biomass cookstoves at the CBS CEMIE-Bio project in Mexico.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Biomass cookstoves are important in the developing world and have room for improvement since a large percentage of people living in rural areas still satisfy their cooking and heating needs using local biomass fuels. Different types of biomass cookstove are used around the world and the vast majority involve natural-draft combustion of wood; big efforts to study their performance from an experimental point of view have been conducted. The purpose of this study is to model the fluid flow, heat transfer and gas-phase chemical reactions for a natural-draft biomass plancha-type cookstove that represents a new portable design of the Patsari stove for rural areas in Mexico and to be used for domestic activities. Methodology: A 3D CFD model is set up in ANSYS Fluent v19, using the module of species transport for modelling combustion, a turbulence viscous model and energy equation enabled; whereas, the solver configuration is pressure based type and the simple algorithm is used for steady state solutions. Findings: Power rates in the range of 2.5 and 7.5 kW and two injection areas of 50 and 100 cm2 are analyzed. Contours for the flow, temperature and species mass fractions are obtained; additionally, Nusselt number at the comal surface, air fuel ratio and thermal efficiency are calculated as a function of power rate. Conclusion & Significance: A better combustion and thermal efficiency for the higher power rate cookstove are observed since the percentage of volatiles not burned decreases with the power rate. Authors would like to acknowledge SENER-CONACyT for the financial support through Project 246911. Recent Publications 1. Palacios-Morales C A, Guzman J E V, Beltr�n A, Ruiz-Huerta L, Caballero-Ruiz A, Zenit R (2018) On the maximum operating frequency of prosthetic heart valves. Biomedical Physics and Engineering Express (BPEX), 4, 047007: 1-6. 2. N��ez J, Beltr�n A (2018) On the onset of natural convection in a partially cooled cylinder. Heat Transfer Research, 49 (8): 773-786. 3. Beltr�n A, Ch�vez O, Zaldivar J, God�nez F A, Garc�a A, Zenit R (2017) A new model for the computation of the formation factor of core rocks. Journal of Structural Geology, 97: 189 - 198. 4. Beltr�n A(2017) MHD Natural convection in a liquid metal electrode. Applied Thermal Engineering, 114: 1203-1212. 5. Dom�nguez D R, Beltr�n A, Rom�n J J, Cuevas S, Ramos E (2015) Experimental and theoretical study of the dynamics of wakes generated by magnetic obstacles. Magnetohydrodynamics, 51 (2): 215 ??? 224.

Speaker
Biography:

Ying-Bing Jiang has his expertise in thin film materials and selectively permeable membranes. He developed the method of using plasma-defined atomic layer deposition (ALD) to make sub-10nm ultra-thin membranes. He is a research Professor at the University of New Mexico as well as the founder of Angstrom Thin Film Technologies LLC, USA. In recent years his researches focus on tuning nanostructures by ALD and plasma-ALD, and their applications in ultra-thin membranes for gas separation and selective ion transport. In 2011, one of his ultra- thin desalination membranes received the prestigious “R&D 100 Award” from R&D Magazine. In 2015, his liquideous CO2 separation membranes received another “R&D 100 Award” that was entitled “Green Technology Special Recognition Gold Award ”. Dr. Jiang has also been served as the symposium organizer/session chair and delivered invited talks for a number of major international conferences such as MRS meeting, ACS conferences etc.

Abstract:

The global organic biogas market was worth more than $19.5 billion (???17.2bn) in 2015 and is forecast to exceed $32 billion by 2023, growing at more than 6% CAGR from 2016 to 2023. Biogas is primarily methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). Separation of CO2 from CH4 is an importance step for biogas upgrading. Conventional approach uses pressure swing adsorption (PSA) to remove CO2 from biogas, which is energy intensive. Membrane separation is in general more energy efficient, but the low CO2 permeability of current CO2 membrane results in a consequence that the CO2 separation process typically requires compressing gas to a high pressure to achieve high separation flux, which also consumes a large amount of energy. Therefore a highly permeable and highly selective CO2 membrane is critical for cost-effective biogas purification. Reduced membrane thickness and precise pore size/chemistry control are the keys for achieving combined high flux and selectivity. Membranes in natural biological systems can be down to 4 nm in thickness and the pores are precisely constructed by molecular assembly, leading to unbeatable performance when compared to synthetic industrial membranes that are difficult to be fabricated with similar molecular level precision and are typically 100-1000 times thicker. ALD is a layer-bylayer deposition method that builds up a thin layer with atomic precision in structure and compositions. Here we introduce the membrane fabrication by the combination of molecule self- assembly and a ???plasma-defined??? ALD process where the location of ALD modification is confined by plasma irradiation. Using this approach, hierarchically structured sub-20nm thick ultra-thin membranes with precisely defined pore size and pore surface chemistry have been successfully formed, leading to excellent CO2 permeability and selectivity. Recent Publications 1. Y. Fu, Y.???B. Jiang, et al, and C. Brinker (2018), Bio???inspired ultrathin enzymatic nano???stablized liquid membrane for CO2 capture, Nature Communication (accepted, in press) 2. Fu, Y; Y.???B. Jiang, et al and C. Brinker (2014), Atomic Layer Deposition of L???Alanine Polypeptide. J. of Am. Chem. Soc., Vol 136 : p15821???15824 3. Zhu, JL; et al, Jiang, YB et al, (2014), Porous Ice Phases with VI and Distorted VII Structures Constrained in Nanoporous Silica, Nano Letters, Vol 14, p6554???6558 4. Liu, H. et al, Jiang Y.???B. et al., Synthesis of core/shell structured [email protected]/C with enhanced electrocatalytic activity by regioselective atomic layer deposition combined with a wet chemical method??? RSC ADVANCES Vol 6 (71) 66712???66720 201 5. Moghaddam S, et al, Jiang YB et al (2010), An inorganic???organic proton membrane for fuel cells with a controlled nanoscale pore structure??? Nature Nanotechnology, Vol. 5, 230???236

Andreas Hornung

Fraunhofer Institute for Environmental, Safety, and Energy Technology (UMSICHT), Germany

Title: Advanced liquid biofuels from residue biomass by thermo-catalytic reforming
Biography:

Prof. Hornung is an expert in thermo-catalytic conversion of biomass and organic residues for sustainable fuels and chemical synthesis. He has over 25 years’ experience in developing novel reactor systems for the conversion of biomass and has expertise in designing, building, and operating reactor units to achieve desired outcomes at all scales of operation. Prof. Hornung currently holds positions as Director of the Fraunhofer Institute, Sulzbach-Rosenberg, Germany. Furthermore, he keeps the Chair in Bioenergy at the University of Birmingham (UK) and is Professor in High-Temperature Process technologies at the Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (Germany). He currently holds 21 patents and has published over 250 scientific papers.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: To meet the ambitious political targets regarding the future energy supply, advanced biofuels are needed to reduce the dependency and correlated emissions of fossil fuels. It has become apparent that the transportation sector still offers great potentials to facilitate a sustainable transition. Biogenic fuels that meet fossil fuel standards could therefore utilize in standard fossil fuel engines without market entry barriers. These fuels are only sustainable if the production is not competing for food security or is economically competitive. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: The research focuses on the development of a new thermo-chemical process to convert biogenic carbon-based residues into valuable storable products. The Thermo-Catalytic Reforming (TCR�) is an intermediate pyrolysis process combined with a unique integrated catalytic reforming step. Various biogenic and industrial residues like sewage or digestate were utilized in a TCR�-plant with a capacity of 30kg/h. The purpose of this work was the production of renewable high-quality transport fuels from residual and waste biomass. To reach the high standards of common fuels like gasoline and diesel, the crude TCR�-oils were hydrotreated. Findings: The crude TCR�-oil was hydrotreated at a temperature of 350 �C and a pressure of 140 bar to remove sulfur, nitrogen and oxygen compounds. After hydrogenation, the oil was fractionated into common fuel fractions. The renewable gasoline and diesel were analyzed and showed the required properties to meet fossil fuel standards (EN 228; EN 590). These fractions were successfully tested in modern EURO-6 car engines. Conclusion & Significance: The TCR� of residue biomass and the upgrading of the oils by hydrogenation enable sustainable production of advanced liquid biofuels. The fuels meet fossil fuel standards, and corresponding engine tests demonstrated the ability of the biofuels to substitute fossil fuel without drawbacks like higher fuel consumption or higher emissions. Recent Publications 1. Tilman, D., et al. (2009) Beneficial biofuels - The food, energy, and environment trilemma. Science, 325, 270-271. 2. Alonso, D.M., Bond, J.Q., Dumesic, J.A. (2010) Catalytic conversion of biomass to biofuels. Green Chem., 12, 1493-1513. 3. Mortensen, P.M., et al. (2011) A review of catalytic upgrading of bio-oil to engine fuels. Appl. Catal., A, 407, 1-19. 4. Conti, R., et. al. (2017) Thermocatalytic Reforming of Biomass Waste Streams. Energy Technol., 5, 104-110. 5. Neumann, J., et. al. (2016) Upgraded biofuel from residue biomass by Thermo-Catalytic Reforming and hydrodeoxygenation. Biomass Bioenerg., 89, 91-97.

Biography:

Marine Peyrot works in the LTCB laboratory for 10 years in the LITEN CEA in Grenoble; she has her expertise in biomass and waste pyrolysis and gasification, and more particularly in reactor modeling.The Laboratory for Thermal Conversion of Bioresources (LTCB) works on the development of biomass and waste-to-energy processes (heat, electricity), as well as processes dedicated to the production of 2G/3G biofuels and green chemicals. It has wide expertise in gasification processes and technologies dedicated to dry resources (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained flow reactor) and wet resources (hydrothermal liquefaction, supercritical water gasification). It is equipped with numerous analytical devices to characterize the products (gas, bio-oil, bio-crude, char), study the reaction kinetics, and analyze the inorganic species and their interactions with materials

Abstract:

Bio-oil produced from biomass fast pyrolysis could constitute an alternative to fossil liquid fuels, especially to be combusted for local district heating. So far, only few studies have dealt with bio-oil production by biomass fast pyrolysis in an entrained flow reactor [1], yet it could constitute an alternative to the better-known fluidised bed pyrolysis process. In the context of the BOIL project with the CCIAG Company (Grenoble district heating), a new pilot based on an entrained flow reactor concept has been designed [2]. The pilot design has been carried out on the basis of woody biomass fast pyrolysis experiments and modeling performed in a drop tube reactor as a first step laboratory-scale study, and also CFD modeling [2-3]. The facility is composed of a biomass injection system with a hopper and a feeding screw, an electrically heated pyrolysis reactor, a cyclone to separate gas and char, 3 heat exchangers to cool the gas (at 30�C, 0�C and 0�C respectively) and condense bio-oil, and a post-combustion unit to burn the incondensable species. Gas temperature is maintained at 350�C from the reactor outlet to the entrance of the first heat exchanger in order to avoid bio-oil condensation. In the first experiments performed in the pilot, several conditions were tested: 3 different biomass feedstocks, varying biomass feeding rates from 2 to 9 kg/h and two reactor temperatures 500�C and 550�C. Recovered bio-oil mass yield is on average 40% and its LHV is about 15 MJ/kg. A certain percentage of bio-oil is found after the 3 condensers which means that they are not totally efficient yet. Detailed analyses of the bio-oil produced are in progress. The chemical and physical bio-oil characteristics will be compared to the European Standard recommendations [4].The next steps will be to test bio-oil combustion. Recent Publications 1. J.A. Knight, C.W. Gorton, R.J. Kovac, Biomass 6, pp. 69-76, 1984. 2. Fast pyrolysis reactor for organic biomass materials with against flow injection of hot gases - US 20170166818 A1 3. Guizani, S.Valin, J.Billlaud, M.Peyrot, S.Salvador, Fuel, 2017, 207, pp.71-84. 4. C.Guizani, S.Valin, M.Peyrot, G.Ratel S.Salvador, Woody biomass fast pyrolysis in a drop tube reactor - Pyro2016 conference 5. Fast pyrolysis bio-oils for industrial boilers ??? Requirements and test methods ??? EN 16900